Reflections of Workplace Leadership Styles- What Do YOU Look Like?

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self-reflection“Mirror, Mirror on the wall, Who’s the fairest of them all?”  It’s not just evil queens who need to ask this question about fairness!  When it comes to picking apart those who lead us, it’s easy to point out flaws and weaknesses in their leadership style.  But when is the last time you looked into your own Leadership Mirror?  

If we only chose to look into a mirror once or twice per year to check our hair, we would get pretty ragged in between those checks.  Our personal leadership style is no different.  Regular, even daily evaluation by checking out our “leadership reflection” keeps us sharp and effective!  Can you spot yourself below?

Control Freak/Dictator

  1. When Do They Get Involved?  Before there’s ever a problem, which is sometimes the cause of the problem!
  2. Why Do They Get Involved?  They want to control every person, every decision, every outcome.  It’s all about power and control for this person.
  3. How Do They Get Involved?  Micromanagement of individuals and teams;
  4. Upside(s) of This Leader-  You never have to wonder where this leader stands!  It’s hovering above you!  WHAT ELSE?
  5. Downside(s) of This Leader-  Overbearing, smothering, and stifles the ability of individuals to work out their problems in a healthy and productive manner.  WHAT ELSE?

 

Psychoanalyst

  1. When Do They Get Involved?  They stand back and on the sidelines and don’t get involved unless asked to.
  2. Why Do They Get Involved?  They feel a need to “fix” the people, not address the problems.
  3. How Do They Get Involved?  They try to isolate the parties, “fix” them, and then report back the results to the other parties.
  4. Upside(s) of This Leader-  They do understand that many times the issues are deeper than can be seen from the  surface.  WHAT ELSE?
  5. Downside(s) of This Leader-  Sometimes the problem isn’t the people, but the issues, the policies, the location or a variety of other issues.  WHAT ELSE?

 

Buddy

  1. When Do They Get Involved? Progressively as the situation develops, many times based on gossip or prejudicial and slanted perspectives.
  2. Why Do They Get Involved?  Either to protect their friendship, or because they can’t stand for people to not “get along.”
  3. How Do They Get Involved?  Usually at the request of one of the disgruntled parties.
  4. Upside(s) of This Leader-  They are invested emotionally (at least with one of the parties) and will want to see resolution. WHAT ELSE?
  5. Downside(s) of This Leader-  They may lack objectivity.  WHAT ELSE?

 

Wallflower

  1. When Do They Get Involved? They don’t get involved until the problem is completely out of hand.
  2. Why Do They Get Involved?  Only because they have been put into the leadership position, and their position forces them to get involved.
  3. How Do They Get Involved?  They politely and privately ask permission to help with the situation.
  4. Upside(s) of This Leader-  They are nice people.  WHAT ELSE?
  5. Downside(s) of This Leader-  People with even a slightly strong personality can run this leader over and never find resolution.  WHAT ELSE?

 

Dad

  1. When Do They Get Involved?  After they have personally been affected by the conflict. 
  2. Why Do They Get Involved?  They get involved only after your problems have annoyed them.
  3. How Do They Get Involved?  This leader explodes on whoever has dared to disrupt their routine or cause them grief.
  4. Upside(s) of This Leader-  This kind of leader typically hates bullies, and will deal quickly and effectively with them.  WHAT ELSE?
  5. Downside(s) of This Leader-  Many times they are oblivious to fairly serious problems; but as long as the problems don’t affect them, they don’t notice or don’t care. WHAT ELSE?

 

Referee

  1. When Do They Get Involved?   Conflict doesn’t seem to bother them UNTIL they see it is the result of broken rules.
  2. Why Do They Get Involved?  This person is the strict “rule enforcer” of policies and procedures.
  3. How Do They Get Involved?  They typically go straight to the rule book, and communicate through documentation.
  4. Upside(s) of This Leader-  Making sure staff work within the approved guidelines can keep you out of legal trouble later.  WHAT ELSE?
  5. Downside(s) of This Leader-  Their attachment to the rule book comes before the people involved, or even the good of the organization.  WHAT ELSE?

 

Ostrich

  1. When Do They Get Involved?  They rarely get involved, if ever.
  2. Why Do They Get Involved?  They avoid getting involved because they hate conflict, or they are afraid to.
  3. How Do They Get Involved?  Butt first.
  4. Upside(s) of This Leader-  None.  WHAT ELSE?
  5. Downside(s) of This Leader-  Conflict left unaddressed rarely gets better, and nearly always gets worse.  WHAT ELSE?

 

Mediator

  1. When Do They Get Involved?  The best kind of leader in conflict.  They assess each situation individually, and determine whether inserting themselves quickly, or allowing those in conflict the time and space to work it out.
  2. Why Do They Get Involved?  They not only have the best intentions for the organization, but for the team members as well.  They take their responsibility as a leader seriously.
  3. How Do They Get Involved?  They observe closely, they communicate effectively, they treat people with respect, and they stick to the issues while understanding the personalities involved.
  4. Upside(s) of This Leader-  They are effective.  WHAT ELSE?
  5. Downside(s) of This Leader-  There just aren’t enough of this kind of leader.  WHAT ELSE?

So which leadership reflection best mirrors your own style?


 

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